animal trade, animal welfare, hunting, rhinoceros, Tierschutz, Wildtierschutz

Man, Money & Rhinos – Unravelling the Tangled Knot of Poaching

Very interesting facts and discussion on rhinos and their horns, the preservation, poaching, persecution, and other facts concerning these animals. Thanks to Animalista Untamed here is the blog post:

Animalista Untamed

“We walk around armed at all times. We’re all living 24 hours in a state of readiness. You would start at first light trying to check on all your animals on the reserve, to make sure they’re alive”– Pelham Jones, president of the Private Rhino Owners Association

In 2007, 13 rhino were poached in South Africa. In 2008, 83. Since 2008 poaching has risen by – can you get your head around this? – 8,900%.  And no, I haven’t made a mistake with the noughts. The strange thing is, until that time the white rhino population of the Republic of South Africa was actually increasing. It hardly seems possible. All we hear now is how to save from extinction the iconic African Big Five, one of which is of course, the rhino.

rhino-1077906__180Many in the RSA now believe it’s no coincidence the massive upsurge in poaching suddenly began at just about…

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animal abuse, animal trade, animal welfare, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, PeTA, Petition, seal, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, Wildtierschutz

Baby Seals Slaughter: A Never-Ending Story?

The following gruesome numbers have been made public by PeTA:

  • 33,600: the number of seals who have been slaughtered so far this year on the ice floes off Canada’s east coast
  • 400,000: the number of harp seals allowed to be killed in this year’s commercial seal slaughter

Here is more information:

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/sheryl-fink/atlantic-seal-hunt_b_9611848.html

Canadian Seal Slaughter

http://www.harpseals.org/about_the_hunt/index.php

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

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animal art, animal welfare, Tierschutz, Wildtierschutz

ENDANGERED 13 – A Mural Project Raising Awareness of Endangered Species

Thanks to Animalista Untamed for sharing this beautiful and inspiring project:

Animalista Untamed

13 artists take on a 120 metre stretch of railway arches in Tower Hamlets, London

Dr Zadok – Bateleur

Dr Zadok – Bateleur

Louis Masai  – Bees

Louis Masai – Bees

Louis Masai – Rhino

Louis Masai – Rhino

Carrie Reichardt – Bees

Carrie Reichardt – Bees

Faunagraphic – Grey-breasted Parakeet

Faunagraphic – Grey-breasted Parakeet

Fiya One – Sumatran Orangutan

Fiya One – Sumatran Orangutan

Louis Masai – Coral Reefs

Louis Masai – Coral Reefs

Jim Vision – Polar Bear

Jim Vision – Polar Bear

ATM  – Curlew

ATM – Curlew

Louis Masai – Blue Whale

Louis Masai – Blue Whale

Vibes  – Tiger

Vibes – Tiger

Xenz  – Hummingbird

Xenz – Hummingbird

Andy Council  – Asian Elephant

Andy Council – Asian Elephant

Jonesy – Western Lowland Gorilla

Jonesy – Western Lowland Gorilla

Von Leadfoot  – Haiku Lettering

Von Leadfoot – Haiku Lettering

Charlotte Webster – Human Nature Founder

Charlotte Webster – Human Nature Founder

Olivia Skalkos – Project co-ordinator

Olivia Skalkos – Project co-ordinator

Where’s Kong – Film

Where’s Kong – Film

Tanya Loretta Dee – Haiku Poet

Tanya Loretta Dee – Haiku Poet

Ian Cox – Camera

Ian Cox – Camera


According to the International Union of Conservation of Nature (IUCN) there are currently 23,250 species listed as threatened. This means: critically endangered, endangered or vulnerable. Adding extinct and extinct in the wild species the figure is 24,153.

It’s widely predicted that as many as two-thirds of…

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animal abuse, animal habitat, animal rescue, animal trade, animal welfare, say no to animals in entertainment, The Humane Society of the United States, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, whale

A Whale’s Tale – SeaWorld & The Humane Economy Part 2

Please watch and share. Thank you to Animalista Untamed for bringing this to our attention.

Animalista Untamed

A nice glimpse into the workings of the Humane Economy where everyone’s a winner, most of all the animals, we hope.

This short video makes the perfect conclusion to A Whale’s Tale – SeaWorld & The Humane Economy Part 1

Many thanks to Our World for sharing. It’s well worth the watch.

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animal abuse, animal habitat, animal rescue, animal sanctuary, animal shelter, animal trade, animal welfare, elephant, hunting, Nosey the Elephant, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, PeTA, refuge, say no to animals in entertainment, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, tiger, Wildtierschutz, World Animal Protection

A Camera Can Be as Deadly as a Gun

Friends just returned from a trip to Thailand, sending me a picture of them with two tigers. They unknowingly had been lured into a typical tourist trap. The tigers were being held in a place that claimed to be a “sanctuary”, but in reality cubs of many different species are torn from their mothers, confined into tiny cages and only taken out for photo sessions with tourists. Once they grow too old or become too dangerous to handle, “acting up” despite severe punishment they are sent off to farms for canned hunting.

“Do you remember Cecil, the beloved lion who was illegally lured from a Zimbabwe park and painfully killed with a bow and arrow last summer? Unfortunately, despite the public outrage of this sad and very unnecessary death, thousands of other lions continue to suffer at the hands of the tourism industry today.

World Animal Protection has investigated the lives of captive lions in Africa and were appalled by what we found. We are desperately trying to help these lions, but they need your help too.

What We Found

Lion cubs bred in captivity are ripped from their mothers at less than a month old. At just a few weeks old, cubs will begin to be handled by tourists for pictures, often roughly, causing them chronic stress and sometimes injury. Any aggressive behavior they display is punished using fear and pain. Tourists are even instructed to hit the lions if they act unruly. When they are not being handled, they are kept in small concrete enclosures and fed inadequately.


A group of lions in a facility in South Africa. These lions will likely be euthanized or sold for canned hunting.

As the cubs grow into lions, they will become too dangerous for these tourist parks. No longer profitable as toys for tourists, the lions might be euthanized or sold to farms for “canned hunting.” Canned hunting uses whatever means necessary to ensure a kill, including drugging the lions or luring them with meat. The area is enclosed so the lions cannot escape. They do not stand a chance at survival.”

Sadly, this happens all around the world, with tigers, lions, almost any wild animal.

Please never pay for having a picture taken with a wild animal. Never ride an animal, be it donkey or elephant.

If you want to visit an animal sanctuary, ask people who know where to find a legitimate one, most animal welfare organizations will be able to point you into the right direction. Tell your family, tell you friends.

Here are some helpful links:

http://www.worldanimalprotection.us.org/take-action/be-compassionate-traveler

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/oct/04/wild-animal-tourism-think-twice

Why You Should Turn Your Back on Elephant Rides

Thailand’s Cruel Captive Elephant Industry

http://right-tourism.com/destinations/asia/thailand/#sthash.aQTnV8oh.dpbs

http://savenoseynow.org

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

 

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adoption, animal abuse, animal rescue, animal shelter, animal welfare, dog, dog adoption, Soi Dog, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz

A Little Help Goes a Long Way for These Dogs: Helping Street Dogs in Thailand

photo: Soi Dog

photo: Soi Dog

One of the largest dog shelters, Soi Dog, in Thailand is run by a very few, extremely dedicated people. The founders, a couple from England, have managed to help save, heal, adopt out many dogs and have come to the aid of over 700 dogs on an island that looks like paradise but was more like hell for these abandoned beings.

You can read more here:

http://www.soidog.org/emails/KohKoodMailing2/KohKoodMailing2OnlineVersion.html

Thanks to you, the cycle of suffering has been broken…

 

Dear Friend of Soi Dog,

I recently wrote to you about the remote Thai island of Koh Kood and the horrific suffering of over 700 stray dogs there. Having been abandoned years ago by hotel construction workers, the dogs were unsterilised and continuing to breed. Innocent puppies were being born into a short, pitiful life of neglect.

This was misery on a huge scale.

A local group, Sabai Dog Koh Kood, were doing their best to care for the worst cases, but with the nearest vet over two hours away, and new puppies being born each week, the situation was out of control. In desperation, Sabai Koh Kood appealed to Soi Dog Foundation. With such a magnitude of suffering, I knew I had to turn to you

Thanks to an outpouring of donations from people like you, two teams of Soi Dog Animal Rescue Officers were able to embark on the arduous 2 day journey to Koh Kood from our base nearly 1200 kilometres away, including a sea crossing by barge – the only way to get all the equipment on to the island.

With assistance from The Department of Livestock Bangkok, who provided additional vets for the first four days, Sabai Dog Koh Kood, the local authority and local hospital, staff from local hotels (notably the luxury Soneva Kiri resort and the Tinkerbell resort), and many local people, the project was finally underway.

Dogs waiting to be sterlisedThe stray dogs of Koh Kood waiting their turn to be sterilised.
 

By the time our team returned 2 weeks later, 559 dogs and 104 cats had been spayed/neutered and fully vaccinated. With over 300 female dogs sterilised, that is a minimum of 3,000 puppies spared in the first year alone.

Our vets also performed a number of major surgeries on badly injured dogs, including some who had survived partially severed limbs that had been caught in snares. With most of the dogs suffering from skin conditions, Sabai Dog Koh Kood were provided with medication and training to care for these easily-treated cases.

With a number of jungle dogs too wild to be caught, along with many puppies too young for surgery, discussions are now underway to send a smaller team back to the island in the near future.

The endless cycle of suffering has finally been broken. YOU have had a direct impact on the lives of hundreds of desperate animals. Your support has brought a seemingly hopeless situation under control.

The vet team hard at workThe vet team busy at work sterlising the stray dogs of Koh Kood.
 

Be proud of what you have achieved because it couldn’t have happened without you.

On behalf of the animals whose lives you have changed, I simply wanted to say thank you.

Best Wishes,


John Dalley
Co-Founder,
Soi Dog Foundation

https://www.soidog.org

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

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Uncategorized

This is the Future – 5 Awesome People Make Fabulous ‘Post-Animal’ Food

Even if not in New York City, let these people inspire you. Thank you, Animalista Untamed, for posting this blog:

Animalista Untamed

A New York Restaurateur Goes Vegan: Can He Turn A Profit And Satisfy His Conscience?

rsz_ravi_headshot-1200x800

Such a shame it’s all happening in #NYC – c’mon #London, catch up!

In December, #RaviDeRossi, the owner of 15 restaurants and bars in Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, made a radical business decision: he resolved to convert as many of his restaurants as possible to vegan menus. Like many entrepreneurs, he’s struggling with how to stay true to his personal values while running a viable business.

Forbes’ headline is misleading. Ravi didn’t ‘go vegan’. The former successful abstract painter says he has been vegan most of his life. I love this man – it was while taking time at home to care for his dying cat that he did some serious soul-searching and decided that “I wanted to start turning my restaurants #vegan.” He said he could no longer justify the toll his practices were taking on the environment…

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