This is another in-depth, excellently research blog post by Animalista Untamed that I am thankful to be able to share with you.

Animalista Untamed

No-one knew that orangutans are unique among great apes, possibly unique among animals altogether with the exception of the human animal, in having the ability to talk about the past.

But now we do. Recently a researcher was surprised to find that the apes’ response to, say, a tiger’s presence is to gather their young to them and climb higher up the tree – in silence. You would expect the evasive action to be accompanied by an alarm call. Theirs is an endearing kind of “kiss-squeak” sound. Strangely though, they wait sometime until after the predator has entirely disappeared before they emit their kiss-squeak of alarm.
What on earth is the use of that, we ask. Isn’t that a bit late? Well, it seems the orangutan mums are transmitting a message to their infants, “THAT WAS DANGER! Remember for next time.”
Zoologists have a name for ‘talking about something…

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This Remarkable Ape is Hitting ALL the Headlines – And Not Before Time

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animal welfare, factory farming, farm animals, gegen Massentierhaltung, Massentierhaltung, slaughter, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, vegan

Stephen Hawking’s Connection To Animals

In the Telegraph (Great Britain) you can find this interesting article on animals and factory farming, the universe and its connection to how we treat animals:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking-man/11761701/We-all-need-to-stop-eating-meat-now-and-this-is-why.html

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

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High Schools Across China Are Now Offering Animal Welfare Courses!

Animalista Untamed has put some very interesting facts together on China and its future plans on animal welfare:

Animalista Untamed

“In a long due yet still impressive act of growth, the Chinese Ministry of Education has added an animal welfare course for high schools and students.”

This is MAJOR good news, so welcome after everything anti-animal and anti-nature emanating from the other side of the Pacific in the USA, a country which is travelling back into the dark ages under the present administration.

What makes the news even more exciting is that China has a population of 1.411 billion¹, the largest of any country in the world. And approximately 30% of them are aged between 0 – 24 years². That is a lot of young people, and they will be the ones to shape the country’s future.

Can we hope this is a turning point in Chinese attitudes towards animals and Nature? There have been some exciting trends in the last couple of years –

  • In 2016 the Chinese government formulated…

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animal abuse, animal rescue, animal sanctuary, animal welfare, elephant, Keine Tiere im Zirkus, legal, Nosey the Elephant, refuge, saved for now, say no to animals in entertainment, Tierquälerei, Tierrecht, Tierrettung, Tierschutz, victory, Wildtierschutz

Success for Nosey, the Elephant!

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Photo: PeTA

One of my first blog posts was about Nosey, the elephant. Today, four years later, I am grateful and immensely happy to share with you that this one elephant is finally in a safe  sanctuary, will never be exploited again.

Many, many people worked together for this happy ending – hopefully it will be the beginning of the end of animal exploitation in entertainment.

23. JAN. 2018 — A Lawrence County, Alabama judge has ruled today that Nosey the elephant will be able to stay in true sanctuary at The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee. A case against Nosey’s notorious owners, the Liebel Family Circus, was heard on December 15, 2017, and Judge Angela Terry has ruled that Nosey will remain at the Sanctuary PERMANENTLY!

SAVE NOSEY NOW has worked since 2013 for this day, chasing this small family circus from town to town all over the country, never giving up on Nosey for one day. We pushed hard at the USDA who was charged with upholding the Animal Welfare Act by promoting call-in actions, tweetstorms, letter writing campaigns, and a formal march on their Washington, DC site in June 2015. We also dug deep into the patterns of abuse by this small family circus and pushed hard against the Florida Wildlife Commission who repeatedly rubberstamped the permit for this abusive family to keep and use Nosey. Our work involved research into many state and city animal laws as Nosey was hauled around the country from state to state, city to city, day to day, month to month, year to year. We were successful in shutting down venues in many locations as the entities were educated about the true life of Nosey the elephant.

We have run into many obstacles along the way to Nosey’s freedom, but the powers aligned in the little town of Moulton, Alabama on a fateful day in November, 2017 where Nosey was spotted by some very brave local women. These women saw a wrong and decided to fix it. Googling Nosey, Save Nosey Now was found, and we were able to provide assistance to the local officials throughout the proceedings with documents, pictures and videos to strengthen the case against the circus owners. Contacting the law enforcement division of PETA, more resources were on the way to Alabama. Save Nosey Now was pleased to be a part of the bench trial in Lawrence County, Alabama, and to provide assistance wherever needed.

We thank the good people of Alabama for their perseverance and follow through. We thank our supporters who have always believed that this day would come for Nosey, and we thank all the other organizations who worked hard for Nosey for many years.”

Nosey the Elephant’s story can be found here:

https://www.facebook.com/Nosey-The-Elephant-Needs-Our-Help-207161135983376/

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/sangita-iyer/elephant-abuse_b_5769818.html

https://www.elephants.com/news/press-releases/posts/nosey-arrives-safely-at-the-elephant-sanctuary

Judge gives Lawrence County custody of Nosey the elephant

Thank you for spreading the news on animal awareness!

 

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When Money Speaks Louder Than Compassion

Thanks to Animalista Untamed here is a well researched post on animals used in research:

Animalista Untamed

“A key reason animals are still used so widely is money. Vivisection is very big business. The pharmaceutical industry is the most profitable industry in the world and its interests are strongly protected by governments. Animal experiments are in the industry’s interests because they can be used to market their products more quickly and – most importantly – they provide a legal defence for the company when people are injured or killed by ADRs [adverse drug reactions]. They will argue that, having carried out the animal tests, no blame can be laid at their door.”– Animal Aid

Animal advocates – up against “the most profitable industry in the world”– that is some formidable foe. Faunalytics Fundamentals aims to arm us for the fight with the best and latest data from the USA on what people think about the issue of animal research; and on the millions of animals…

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animal sanctuary, animal welfare, cow, factory farming, farm animals, Farm Sanctuary, gegen Massentierhaltung, Massentierhaltung, Tierschutz

Farm Sanctuary’s Insight on Cows

For those who have never had the chance to pet a cow or see her of him run happily over a meadow, the following insights might seem a bit exaggerated. Once you get to learn more about these sentient beings you will hopefully never want to eat them (or even take away their milk). This is from the Farm Santuary’s blog:

Meet the Animals: Cows

New! The Someone Project is pleased to release its third white paper: “Thinking Cows: A REVIEW OF COGNITION, EMOTION, AND THE SOCIAL LIVES OF DOMESTIC COWS

Cow Behavior, Emotion, and Intelligence

  • “Cows have a secret mental life in which they bear grudges, nurture friendships, and become excited over intellectual challenges…” — The Sunday Times (UK)

Goats are merry pranksters, chickens and turkeys are inquisitive and always exploring, pigs are the brains of the operation, and cattle are the farm’s deeply social and most contemplative residents.

Cows interact with one another in complex ways, forming collaborative relationships (for example, they form “grooming partnerships,” just like chimpanzees)1, learning from one another, and making decisions based on altruism and compassion2. Sunday Times science editor Jonathan Leake explains that “cows have a secret mental life in which they bear grudges, nurture friendships, and become excited over intellectual challenges…”3

As a researcher at Moulton College in the UK, Krista McLennan has documented the fact that cattle form deep friendships and strong family bonds. Like humans, when cattle “have their preferred partner with them, their stress levels in terms of their heart rates are reduced compared with if they are with a random individual.”4

Because of their complex social lives, they are also quite intelligent. Professor Donald Broom from Cambridge University explains: “[S]ocial animals such as cattle…need substantial intellectual ability in order to cope with their complex social life.”5 As another indication of their intelligence, cows have great memories. Professor Joe Stookey from the University of Saskatchewan explains that cattle “demonstrate good spatial memory (they remember where things are located). … They can remember migration routes, watering holes, shelter, and the location of their newborn calf.”6 Other researchers report that cows remember the best spots in a pasture for grazing.7

They are also good problem solvers. Professor Broom explains that when cows solve problems, “[t]heir brainwaves showed their excitement; their heartbeat went up, and some even jumped into the air. We called it their Eureka moment.”8 Explains Guardian science reporter Laura Spinney, “The evidence that they are capable of learning associations suggests brains that are…aware of what has happened in the past and of acting on it in the future.”9

Tim Sell, chair of the UK’s National Farmers Union explains: “They are all individuals and all have their own characteristics. They are tremendously curious. They have emotional storms. When it is a miserable, cold day, they will all be miserable, but when it is nice and sunny, you can almost see them smiling.”10

Dr. John Webster echoes Sell’s comments: “You only have to watch how cows and lambs both seek and enjoy pleasure when they lie with their heads raised to the sun on a perfect English summer’s day. Just like humans.”11 And, as Dr. Temple Grandin explains, “When big old huge dairy cows are let out in the spring, after spending the whole winter cooped up in the barn, man, they just jump around all over the fields like little calves. It’s the same feeling young animals have when they play.”12

Meet Cinci and Sonny
Farm Sanctuary’s Susie Coston reflects: “Cinci holds a special place in our hearts here at Farm Sanctuary. She leapt a six-foot fence at a slaughterhouse near Cincinnati (hence her name) and hid out in a park for 10 days before she was finally caught by the local SPCA. As you can imagine, she was incredible and very smart. Farmers said she was dangerous — that she was probably culled from a breeding herd because she was nuts, and she would likely kill someone, but she was nothing but respectful to us.

rescued cow Cinci Freedom
Cinci Freedom

Well, except this one time. We were attempting to have her hooves trimmed with the other cattle. The trimmer came with his chute and set up. We got to Cinnci, and she slammed the trimmer to the ground, turned, and took out two gates and a slider door in a matter of about 30 seconds. Then she jumped the fence. When the trimmer drove away, she returned to the herd. From that point on, when she heard his truck — which clanks with metal — she would jump the fences and stay far away until he left, and then she would again return to the herd.

rescued cow Cinci Freedom
Cinci Freedom

Her death was also incredible — there was a huge respect for her in the herd and also an obvious awareness of her fear of people and their protectiveness of her during her final month or so. I really miss her so much.”

Sonny is a male calf who was born into the dairy industry. His owner brought him to the stockyard as a weak and injured newborn for a quick sale for veal or cheap beef. Today, Sonny is a rambunctious boy. He’s playful, confident, and maybe just a little bit spoiled from the round-the-clock care he received from Farm Sanctuary caregivers after his rescue. He was found just after his birth in a filthy stall, too weak to stand, his umbilical cord torn from his belly leaving a badly infected wound. Sonny never knew his mother or nursed from her, so he lacked the rich colostrum that was critical for his health and immunity. But with bottle-feeding, blood transfusions, and lots and lots of attention, the baby boy has grown into an irrepressible youngster.

Rescued farm animal, farm animal sanctuary
Sonny

You’ll usually find him looking for fun — or trouble — with his buddies, Conrad and Orlando. In the early morning, the boys moo and protest until someone finally comes with their food. Sonny checks in with his pig friends, Sebastian and Eric, only to be nipped on the nose. He tests the gates, hoping for a chance to sneak into places he shouldn’t be, then settles in for a day of fun with Conrad and Orlando. These overgrown boys spend their days together playing, complaining, napping, and playing some more. Always curious and ever testing his limits, Sonny finds a visitor’s camera bag and tosses it in the air and generally makes a nuisance of himself until one of his beloved caretakers relents and gives him a good old scratch on the neck. He still struggles with minor health issues from his rough start, but that doesn’t stop this boy from kicking up his heels in pure delight.

Sonny rescued farm animal, farm animal sanctuary
Sonny

1Spinney, L. (March 16, 2005). More than meats the eye. The Guardian.
2Hatkoff, A. (2009). Inner World of Farm Animals, New York, NY: Stewart, Tabori & Chang, pp. 68, 75.
3Leake, J. (Feb 27, 2005). The secret life of moody cows. The Sunday Times.
4Heifer so lonely: How cows have best friends and get stressed when they are separated. (July 5, 2011). Daily Mail.
5Hatkoff, A. (2009). Inner World of Farm Animals, New York, NY: Stewart, Tabori & Chang, p. 64.
6Stookey, J.M. (Nov. 18. 1997). “Maternal Behavior of Beef Cows,” Proceedings of the 1997 Saskatchewan Beef Symposium, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
7Bailey, D.W., et al. (1989). Association of relative food availabilities and locations by cattle. Journal of Range Management, 42, 480–482.
8Hagen, K., & Broom, D.M. (March 25, 2004). Emotional reactions to learning in cattle. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 85, 203–213.
9Spinney, L. (March 16, 2005). More than meats the eye. The Guardian.
10A seething cauldron of bovine emotions. (March 3, 2005). Essex Chronicle, Northcliffe Newspapers Company.
11Bekoff, M. (2008). The Emotional Lives of Animals, Novato, CA: New World Library, p. 55.
12Grandin, T. (2005). Animals in Translation, New York, NY: Scribner, p. 119.

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The Next Extinction – Donkeys??

This is a well put together article on the plight of yet another being. Donkeys have been used and abused probably almost as long as humans walk the earth. What is their chance of survival? And is survival and any cost really worth the price of abuse?

Animalista Untamed

“Donkeys may soon go extinct if they continue to be killed.” 

Abubakar Ya’u, Nigerian sand-digger

China is on a quest to buy up the global supply of donkeys.

With a population of a whopping 1.4 billion – the largest of any country in the world and bigger than the populations of North America, South America, Australia, New Zealand, and all of Western Europe combined – the country of China is one gigantic gaping mouth sucking up commodities from every corner of the planet. And in no arena of global trade is this more true than with the trade in wildlife ‘products’, legal and illegal.
Traditional Chinese medicine is the villain of this story, not only for horribly cruel practices like extracting bile from captive bears, condemning the poor animals to a life of utter misery, but also for the tiger bones, pangolin scales, dried seahorse, antelope, buffalo and rhino horn, deer…

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