animal abuse, animal rescue, animal sanctuary, animal trade, animal welfare, bird, calf, chicken, cow, factory farming, farm animals, gegen Massentierhaltung, Henne, horse, Huhn, Kalb, Kaninchen, Kuh, Massentierhaltung, Pferd, pig, Schwein, sheep, slaughter, Tierschutz, turkey, vegan, working animals

Meeting Fiona Oakes, Tower Hill Stables Animal Sanctuary

This is a wonderful example of an animal sanctuary in England. It is run by a dedicated person who also is on of the world’s fastest runners, running on plant based energy.

Last weekend I visited Tower Hill Stables Animal Sanctuary in Asheldham, Essex, England. This is the nearest farm animal sanctuary to me, so I wanted to check it out and meet some of the animals. I was also really excited to meet Fiona Oakes, who runs the sanctuary with her partner, Martin. It was a cold, rainy day which made me realise that running a sanctuary of over 400 rescued animals couldn’t be easy.

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Fiona is a dedicated marathon runner and a committed vegan. She challenges the myth that vegans are weak and do not have the same strength as carnivores, and does so by completing extreme marathons, for which she trains every single day. Since 2013, she is the fastest woman in the world to run a marathon on all seven continents, she has even completed marathons in destinations such as the North Pole!

Fiona leads…

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animal abuse, animal trade, animal welfare, bird, calf, chicken, Compassion over Killing, cow, dog, factory farming, farm animals, gegen Massentierhaltung, humane education, Hund, Kaninchen, legal, Massentierhaltung, Mercy for Animals, monkey, Nonhuman Rights Project, pig, rabbit, release, Schutzengel fuer Tiere e.V., slaughter, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, vegan

What Is the Difference between a Dog Farm and a Hog Farm?

The only difference

If you ever have attended a western-style barbecue you will most certainly have seen a pig being roasted over a fire. And if you have traveled through some parts of Asia you might have come across a dog on a spike being roasted over a fire pit.

If you go shopping through almost any super market in the western hemisphere you will come across rows and rows of products made from animals such as pigs, cows, sheep, chickens, turkeys, and maybe some rabbits, too. They will hardly ever still be recognizable as coming from any of these beings, because how would you cook a whole cow? Even a rabbit still wearing her fur coat seems to be unappealing to the appetite of someone who would most happily chew on a part of her. There also might be different varieties of animals from the sea, some fish will be lying on ice, others have been cut into smaller pieces so that you no longer know who was chopped up into easily cookable portions. And you might see tanks with live animals like lobsters and other sea creatures.

In many Asian markets and food stores, you will see a different variety of foods, including different animals displayed either in bits and pieces or as a whole for human consumption. If you have ever walked over a farmer’s market in different parts of the world you will certainly have come across whole chickens hanging – either still alive or having been killed recently – from wooden beams. There will be goats and sheep cut open, their intestines removed, but otherwise still easily recognizable as the animals that would have walked to the market with the farmer. There will be cages with chickens, birds, and, depending where in the world you are, maybe with monkeys, maybe with dogs.

More and more stories have come up recently showing us pictures of dog farms in Korea. And of these farms being raided by animal rights organizations, taking the dogs and rescuing them from being slaughtered for human consumption. What would a farmer in Iowa, North Carolina, Germany, China, or Russia say, if a group of people would rescue their pigs and cows from the slaughterhouse? If this group of people would say that the way they have been treating these animals in their care is inhumane and therefore these beings need to be rescued? If these people would say that it is inhumane to eat such a being because it is a sentient being?

Humane education is one of the most important parts in raising awareness, in leading a path away from inhumane traditions, in bringing insight into the plight of millions of animals. Pointing with fingers at those who do something differently will probably not lead to a change of thinking. But giving someone the possibility to look at the picture from another angle, and giving someone the chance to decide on their own how to change their ways will most likely lead to a willful readiness in change. And this will not only save those  sentient beings stuck in that cage in this moment but to less cages in the future.

More information can be found here:

https://www.change.org/p/boycott-hyundai-kia-samsung-lg-until-s-korea-bans-the-dog-and-cat-torture-and-consumption/u/15449406?tk=J1dzEIa0oMxu1lb0sGS1DvpeBQQHl2gjFw9VgpRFmg8&utm_source=petition_update&utm_medium=email

http://www.mercyforanimals.org/the-problem

http://koreandogs.org

https://www.aspca.org/animal-cruelty/factory-farms

http://humaneeducation.org

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

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animal welfare, bird, National Wildlife Federation, Refugium, Tierschutz, Vogel

Make Birds Feel at Home

Photo: National Wildlife Federation

Photo: National Wildlife Federation

More and more birds are losing their homes due to loss of habitat. The National Audubon Society is painting a bleak picture for the future of birds, telling us, that more and more species will disappear by the year 2050.

Here are some tips to help the birds in your area through the next winter:

  1. “Provide running water. Birds require water year-round. The sound of running water in a birdbath or pond will be heard by birds from some distance, draw them in for a drink, and possibly a quick dip as well.
  2. Clean out birdhouses. Make necessary repairs to birdhouses in preparation for species that roost during fall and winter. In many areas, bluebirds, chickadees, nuthatches and winter wrens may take up nightly residence in birdhouses to keep warm and safe.
  3. Create brush piles. Save your fall clippings of branches and twigs. Then, pile them in a corner of the yard to create cover for birds that prefer habitat on the ground—such as dark-eyed juncos, tree sparrows and white-throated sparrows.
  4. Increase the number of feeders. In the cooler days of fall, birds increase their food consumption and will continue to do so as the temperature drops.
  5. Plant evergreens. Planted near feeders and birdbaths, evergreens are perfect for providing cover for birds after deciduous trees lose their leaves.”

You can learn more about making your back yard a home for birds and other species here

http://www.nwf.org/How-to-Help/Garden-for-Wildlife.aspx?campaignid=WH14F1DSCXX&s_subsrc=Web_Sidebar_CWH_HowToHelp

http://climate.audubon.org

 

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

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animal welfare, bird, Hessische Gesellschaft für Ornithologie, Tierschutz, Vogel

Nur eigenständig Fliegen wäre schöner

Foto: HGON.de

Foto: HGON.de

Wer fasziniert ist von den langen Wegen der Vögel, im Frühjahr und im Herbst immer wieder den Blick gen Himmel richtet, in der Hoffnung hoch am Firmament ziehende Kraniche zu entdecken, oder jeden Morgen lächelnd erwacht, weil das Singen der Amseln den Tag freudig erscheinen lässt, der kann sih noch weiter informieren bei der Hessischen Gesellschaft für Ornithologie.

Und wer bei seinen Vogelbeobachtungen noch aufmerksamer hinschaut, kann seine Beobachtungen hier ebenfalls melden.

http://www.hgon.de

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