animal rights, animal trade, animal welfare, chimpanzee, Tierrecht, Tierschutz

Apes Much Cleverer than We’ve Been Told – And Other Monkey Business

Such an insightful blog post by Animalista Untamed, please read:

Animalista Untamed

I doubt I’m alone in thinking that when it comes to scientific studies, researchers do have a tendency to find what they’re looking for. And if you believe as a human that you sit astride the topmost rung of the evolutionary ladder, your ‘scientific’ view of other animals’ abilities is already skewed out of true.

This is exactly what has happened over two decades’ worth of studies into apes. Yes, the scientists did say apes are clever – just not as clever as us. But conducting a new analysis of all those studies, Dr Leaven¹ discovered that “what we think we know about apes’ social intelligence is based on wishful thinking and flawed science.”

“The fault underlying decades of research and our understanding of apes’ abilities is due to such a strongly-held belief in our own superiority, that scientists have come to believe that human babies are more socially…

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against animal testing, animal abuse, animal rights, animal sanctuary, animal welfare, chimpanzee, experiments, HSUS, Nonhuman Rights Project, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, saved for now, The Humane Society of the United States, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, victory, Wildtierschutz

Good News: The Chimpanzees in Liberia Will be Receiving the Care They Need and Deserve

Breaking news: The HSUS, New York Blood Center announce landmark agreement for care of Liberian chimpanzees

May 30, 2017

Today, The HSUS announces a major, multi-million-dollar agreement with the New York Blood Center (NYBC) concerning more than 60 chimpanzees formerly used by the NYBC in medical experiments in Liberia. The New York-based medical charity has committed $6 million to The HSUS to help with the decades-long task of providing long-term care for the animals. This morning’s joint announcement signals a critical turnaround in The HSUS’s relationship with the NYBC. Most importantly, it provides financial resources for the careful stewardship of these chimpanzees, who deserve every measure of human mercy after the travails they’ve endured.

In 2015, The HSUS and Humane Society International responded to an emergent crisis and began to care for the chimpanzees on a set of estuarine islands in Liberia with insufficient natural food and water resources. Dedicated individuals took it upon themselves to provide enough food and water for the chimpanzees to survive in the first days, but the circumstance required the intervention of a party that had the staying power to provide daily care to the animals. With the support of the Liberian government and more than 35 animal protection and conservation organizations worldwide, The HSUS stepped in, bringing on many of the chimps’ long-term caregivers to provide boots on the ground for the animals. We’ve been there ever since, at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars a month. We have a staff of more than 30 people operating the facility, led by great ape specialists Dr. Jim Desmond and Jenny Desmond, as well as John Zeonyuway and Joseph Thomas, who have worked with the chimpanzees in Liberia for decades.

To care for these animals, we had to confront some extreme logistical, security, and personnel challenges, in addition to shouldering responsibility for the immense financial liabilities that this intervention required. In the broadest sense, we were mindful that chimpanzees are long-lived, and our response to this crisis essentially obligated us to a 40-year commitment and millions of dollars to provide proper housing, enrichment, and veterinary care for them.

The crux of the agreement announced today stipulates that the NYBC and The HSUS are effectively splitting costs for long-term care of the chimpanzees, which will include day-to-day care and also the construction of improved sanctuary facilities. The HSUS and HSI will take on responsibility for the lifetime care of the chimpanzees and will seek support from our supporters and others to help raise the remainder of the needed funds.

I am pleased to express my thanks to the NYBC for making this very generous and important commitment. I’d be remiss, too, if I did not offer our sincerest expression of gratitude to thousands of individuals and dozens of organizations whose generosity and kindness allowed us to help the chimps for the past two years, providing a bridge to an even more secure future with the new facilities we intend to build. This project has required an ensemble cast, and I offer additional earnest appreciation to the government of Liberia, the Arcus Foundation, Dr. Jane Goodall and the Jane Goodall Institute, Duke University scientist Brian Hare, former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson, actors and animal advocates Kate and Rooney Mara, the American Anti-Vivisection Society, and the Liberia Animal Welfare and Conservation Society. And the most important thanks are reserved for our incredible chimpanzee care team on the ground.

The HSUS and HSI plan to work hand in hand with the government of Liberia in the years ahead, and that partnership will be critical given that the chimps have been through very difficult circumstances and need round-the-clock care.

The additional millions we must raise are still a very substantial financial burden we must bear, but we do so knowing of the steadfast resolve and commitment of our supporters. We intend to start building an endowment for the care of these chimps today, rather than leaving the task to future generations of leaders and other supporters of The HSUS. I hope you’ll join us in celebrating the HSUS-NYBC agreement and adding to the $6 million endowment by making a donation to this Liberian chimp fund online at: www.humanesociety.org/liberiasanctuary or www.humanesociety.org/liberiachimps.

Read more here:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/05/30/dozens-of-research-chimps-were-abandoned-on-liberian-islands-a-battle-over-their-fate-is-now-over/?utm_term=.1a08c1f5527d#comments

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animal abuse, animal welfare, chimpanzee, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, PeTA, say no to animals in entertainment, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, victory

Selling Something Is not the Animal’s Job

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photo: PeTA

When animals are used in commercials they are supposed to sell the product. And this usually works quite well, otherwise the industry would have stopped this many years ago. But people are becoming more and more critical to this use (and often abuse) of other beings. So here is some good news:

After more than 51,000 supporters wrote to GEICO with complaints about its recent commercial featuring a chimpanzee “actor,” the company has promised never again to feature chimpanzees and other great apes in its commercials! Moreover, the ad agency that created the commercial, The Martin Agency, has pledged to leave chimpanzees and all other great apes out of its future campaigns. With this compassionate decision, The Martin Agency joins a growing list of top ad agencies—including BBDO, Grey Group, TBWA, McCann Erickson, J. Walter Thompson, and Y&R—that have also agreed not to use great apes in ad campaigns.”

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

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animal sanctuary, animal welfare, chimpanzee, Tierschutz

Chimpanzee Sanctuary NW – Memorial Stones

When and if more and more non-human beings are released from whatever kind of prison they had been kept in, be it circus, zoo or medical research facility, there are sanctuaries willing to take them in. Here is one of them:

Vegan Lynx

Share the chimp love with Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest – watch the video to warm your heart and help us raise $12,000 by Valentine’s Day.

Click here to donate.

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AAVS American Anti-Vivisection Society, against animal testing, animal abuse, animal sanctuary, animal welfare, chimpanzee, gegen Tierversuche, Tierschutz

Chimpanzees and the American Anti-Vivisection Society

For all of you who want to read more on chimpanzees and their well-being, there is a wonderful publication out from the American Anti-Vivisection Society:

Please share widely. Thank you for spreading the news on animal awareness!

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animal abuse, animal rights, chimpanzee, Nonhuman Rights Project, Tierrecht, Tierschutz

Animals and the Law

It is hard to say what needs to be done first to change the plight of animals: change the human behavior by raising awareness or changing laws according to scientifically based research studies indicating that animals are beings, not things.

The Nonhuman Rights Project believes in the law and has gone to court to fight for the rights of two chimpanzees:

“The New York County Supreme Court Justice Barbara Jaffe issued a 33-page decision in the case of the chimpanzees Hercules and Leo. They are being held in captivity in a Stony Brook University laboratory.

Justice Jaffe denied habeas corpus relief to Hercules and Leo only because, as she wrote, “for now” she is bound by the intermediate appellate court decision in Tommy’s case, which we have placed before the Court of Appeals—New York’s highest Court— seeking further review.

As with Tommy’s and Kiko’s cases, the legal battle will continue as our chimpanzee plaintiffs continue to suffer in captivity the way any self-aware, autonomous being would.

What Justice Jaffe’s decision does is allow us to appeal the decision to First Department which, unlike Justice Jaffe, is not bound by the decision of the Third Department in Tommy’s case.

As we work on what will be a prompt appeal of the decision, we’re pleased also to tell you that:

  • One, Justice Jaffe’s decision was thoughtful and comprehensive. We thank her for so carefully examining our arguments and for having granted the historic Order to Show Cause that compelled the Attorney General’s office to appear in court on May 27th to justify Hercules and Leo’s detention at Stony Brook.
  • Two, Justice Jaffe agreed that the NhRP had standing to litigate on behalf of Hercules and Leo. Indeed, she rejected one by one all the procedural barriers the Attorney General of New York attempted to place before her. She also rejected the argument that “opening the floodgates” to lawsuits on behalf of other nonhuman animals (also known as the “slippery slope” argument) was a sufficient reason for denying relief to Hercules and Leo and refused to follow the appellate decision handed down in Kiko’s case (which is also before the Court of Appeals for further review on our request).
  • Three, she concluded her decision on what we see as a sympathetic, positive note: ´Efforts to extend legal rights to chimpanzees are thus understandable; some day they may even succeed.´We encourage you to read the entire decision and share this news with your friends and fellow nonhuman animal advocates.”

You can read more here:

http://www.nonhumanrightsproject.org

http://www.nonhumanrightsproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Judge-Jaffes-Decision-7-30-15.pdf

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

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