animal sanctuary, animal welfare, mountain lion, National Wildlife Federation, Petition, Tierrettung, Tierschutz, Wildtierschutz

How to Get Safely to the Other Side of the Road

Photo: National Park Service

Photo: National Park Service

Urban areas against rural parts of the world. Who are the first to lose? The animals that need to go from one part of their habitat to another. In several countries around the world wildlife crossings have been built. These crossings, either bridges or tunnels, make it possible for wildlife to travel without having to fear for their life when crossing highways. It is a win-win situation: people and animals are kept safe.

Mountain lions and other vulnerable wildlife in the hills surrounding Los Angeles are trapped by heavily trafficked freeways cutting through their habitat areas—and many are dying trying to make it across freeways to roam or search for food.

But we have an opportunity to provide safe passage for mountain lions in this vital habitat area by creating a wildlife crossing.

Help mountain lions roam their habitat by adding your voice of support for a wildlife crossing. ”

Please read more, sign the petiition, reblog, spread the word

https://online.nwf.org/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1999&autologin=true&s_email_id=20141009_ACT_ENG_WildlifeCrossing_Mountain_Lion%7CMTMemAct

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

 

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animal abuse, animal welfare, mountain lion, National Wildlife Federation, Petition, Tierschutz, Wildtierschutz

California Sprawling Suburbs vs. Mountain Lions (and other animals)

Photo: NWF

Photo: NWF

When people move to the suburbs not only is land taken away from animals, but the infrastructure that makes these places livable and affordable destroy whatever was left for wild animals to survive. The patchwork habitats are clearly not appropriate for survival.

It should be crucial for all planning commissions to take into account the needs of wildlife in the area.

“It’s clear that southern California’s mountain lions need our help; and right now, we have an important opportunity to do just that.

Help secure permanent protections for mountain lion habitat in southern California—urge President Obama to designate the San Gabriel Mountains as a new national monument today.

Mountain lions need large areas of open space for their “home ranges” to search for mates or prey. In the Santa Monica Mountains surrounding Los Angeles, development of multilane highways through their habitat has forced some mountain lions and other wildlife to attempt to cross these heavily trafficked roadways; and sadly, not all have survived the perilous journey.”

Please read more and sign the petition. And please share, too:

https://online.nwf.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=8C4A227CAE5EA150AA339B3CAE74DDCB.app245a?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1995&autologin=true&s_email_id=20140924_ACT_ENG_SanGabrielMtsNationalMonument_MountainLion_RapidResponders%7CMTMemAct

Thank you for spreading the word on animal awareness!

 

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animal shelter, animal welfare, Defender of Wildlife Fund, mountain lion, Tierrettung, Tierschutz

Do Mountain Lions Have to Learn How to Cross a Street?

Photo: Cody S. Hoagland,Defenders of Wildlife

Photo: Cody S. Hoagland,Defenders of Wildlife

 

The names vary, the animal remains the same: whether you are talking about a mountain lion, a cougar, a puma or a panther, this could always mean you are talking about the largest wildcat living in the US. Their habitat is becoming smaller an smaller, so that tone of the threats to these animals is being run over by a truck:

“When California mountain lion “P22” crossed two eight-lane freeways and ended up in the urban wilderness of LA’s Griffith Park, he was lucky to make it across both alive.

Many mountain lions aren’t so fortunate, and are killed by fatal collisions with vehicles as they try to cross freeways that cut throught their mountain habitat.

The mountain lion known as P22 arrived in the urban oasis of Griffith Park about two years ago. And while most mountain lions have an average home range of about 250 square miles, P22 is barely surviving with just 8 square miles.

Right now, P22 is suffering from exposure to rat poisoning used in residential areas and mange. If he had a safe wildlife crossing, he wouldn’t be trapped facing such urban threats—he’d be back roaming his rugged habitat and open wilderness near the Santa Monica Mountains.”

You can read more about the mountain lion here

http://www.defenders.org/mountain-lion/basic-facts

https://online.nwf.org/site/Donation2;jsessionid=683B679C27B206A09A10E9AA4568BF14.app246a?idb=1119893190&DONATION_LEVEL_ID_SELECTED=4701&df_id=35860&35860.donation=form1&idb=0&s_email_id=20140717_MEM_BGV_MissionAppeal_MtnLion_MEM%7CMTMemAct&autologin=true

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