AAVS American Anti-Vivisection Society, against animal testing, animal abuse, animal rights, animal welfare, gegen Tierversuche, neavs, rabbit, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz

What Rabbits Feel

The New England Anti-Vivisection Society – NEAVS – founded in 1895, has been fighting against animal abuse especially in the sciences. Recently, one of the scientists, Dr. Marge Peppercorn, wrote about her experiences with rabbits, a species being tortured by the millions in labs all around the world:

“The Language of Rabbits

As a physician, I understand the need for medical research. What I can’t understand is why we persist in using animals. Researchers use every kind of species in the now recognized mistaken belief that what holds true for them holds true for humans. Some, like mice, are used primarily because they’re inexpensive and easy to handle. None are used with true consideration for their suffering.

Dr Peppercorn Photo.png

A prime example is the rabbit. Bunnies are generally silent with unchanging facial expressions, so it’s easy for researchers to be unaware of their distress and avoid possible pangs of conscience over what they’re doing to them. People think their silence makes them unreadable but bunnies communicate constantly.

I’ve recently become a bunny parent. After having had primarily dogs and cats, I had no idea what to expect. There was no barking, meowing, whining, whimpering, tail wagging or purring. From hours of interaction I’ve learned bunnies do make their feelings clearly known. They stamp their feet when upset or sensing danger. They make a quiet grunt when angry and an extremely soft grinding noise when happy.

None of these messages could possibly be heard over the noise of a lab, but bunnies also use their bodies and ears to communicate. They hunch up when scared and totally flatten out when relaxed. Their ears pull back, eyes widen, and noses twitch rapidly when scared. Their ears stand up straight, eyes relax, and breathing slows to gentle nose wiggles when content. They literally leap for joy when extremely happy and run and hide in a flash when scared. They are affectionate, gentle creatures who will bond with another bunny or animal, groom and sleep tight against their companion, and grieve when it’s gone.

All these behaviors go generally unseen or considered unimportant by the average researcher who sees the rabbit as an inexpensive and uncomplaining test tube. What makes using rabbits even more upsetting is that as a genetically hard wired prey animal they hide feeling weak or sick, therefore making it difficult for researchers to recognize their suffering. As genetic prey animals, they are easily terrified. Even rabbits living for years in a loving home that they should know is a caring environment get terrified by loud noises and require soft voices and gentle handling.

All animals deserve lives free from human inflicted suffering…

All animals deserve lives free from human inflicted suffering, but for me, inflicting pain on gentle, helpless and terrified creatures precisely because they are so gentle and less able to make their distress known is particularly unconscionable. I hope what I’ve learned from Penny helps us all better understand the subtle language of rabbits and their clear desire not to be hurt.”

Please share widely.

You can find more information on NEAVS here:

http://neavs.org

Thank you for spreading the news on animal awareness!

 

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animal welfare, rabbit, Tierschutz

Printable Easter Flyer

Please print and share widely, thank you!

Making Waves 🌸utreach

This is a printable flyer with info tabs at the bottom. The websites I promote are of course my website along with:

I’ve been posting these in my community at Sheetz, Wawa, Mom & Pop Diners..anywhere with a bulletin board! I thought I would share in case others would like to help.

Click here to access file for printing.

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animal welfare, Kaninchen, rabbit, Tierquälerei, Tierschutz, wild rabbit

Merle, the Little Wild Rabbit

 

Photo: Alexandra´s Animal Awareness Blog

Photo: Alexandra´s Animal Awareness Blog

Merle died in my arms. She had been sitting on the side walk and had not moved when I walked close by. I knew something was wrong with her, so I picked her up to check for some obvious injuries, put her in a safe place, gave her some fresh grass. She raised her head and looked at me after a while, seemingly not as terrified as at first.

But then she rolled over on her side and her heart stopped beating.

I know that she is one of almost uncountable many rabbits out there, dying either of natural course (only very few), of being hit by cars, trains, tractors, etc.; being killed through testings on animals; being killed for their fur; being killed for fun by hunters and other strange people who get a kick out death.

I know all of that. For me, Merle was someone special, someone singular and unique.

 

Here are some helpful websites on rabbits – there actually are no statistics out there on how many rabbits die because humans killed them:

http://www.pleasebekind.com/rabbit.html

http://www.adaptt.org/killcounter.html

http://www.rabbit.org/journal/3-1/sheltering-spirit.html

http://www.rabbitmatters.com/wildrabbits.html

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/6166113.stm

 

Saving one animal will not change the world, but the world will change for that one animal – and for you.

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